Sunday, 23 July 2017

PRICING

   




I am what I have read is called a pescatarian.   Sounds vaguely religious, doesn't it?   But no, this word means that I am a vegetarian but also eat fish and seafood.   Some people wouldn't call this vegetarian at all but as I am wont to say, to each her own.    I can see the ocean through my living room window on the west coast of Canada but I have a feeling that the price of fish or seafood  here is the same in the Canadian Prairies or American mid-west.   In other words, expensive.

When food products are priced by the hundred grams, consider it a warning:   It is expensive.   A hundred grams is not very much;   in non-metric measure it is 3.5 ounces.  (Remember, a pound is 16 ounces.).    Southwestern British Columbia is one of the top salmon fishing regions of the world.  Read more here.    Local supermarkets have been running ads about their great salmon prices, bragging about $2.49 per 100 grams for whole salmon with head and tail cut off.     But somehow this translates to a 30 cm (or 12 inch) piece of salmon costing $36.   Yikes.  This would be more than a sirloin tip roast beef would cost and the animals that provide that have to be raised, fed, vetted and otherwise dealt with.   I venture to speculate that the fisherman (or woman) who caught the salmon  received nowhere near that price.

   



A relative explained how he overcame this problem.   Driving to the Steveston neighbourhood, which is part of the Greater Vancouver region in Richmond specifically, he headed straight for the docks at a time when the commercial fishing season was open.    There, shrewd negotiator that he is, he arranged with a fisherman coming in to buy 15 large salmon for $10 each.   Now the fish are not cleaned in any way so he had a job ahead of him but I was told that you get used to it and the task is not difficult.   He ended up with enough salmon in his freezer for a long time less the half of one my copious praise engendered me.

In the case of salmon, as with many other things, try to bypass the middleman.   Get a group together, go on a fishing expedition or head to the docks.    I like to watch the live bear cam this time of year, from a remote location in Alaska.   The bears sit at the bottom of a small waterfall as the salmon attempt to leap over it.   Easy pickings for the bears.   Five minutes of watching features dozens of salmon leaping.   I had to stop shouting, "There's another $36," after family members complained.

I go on a cruise once a year where seafood and salmon galore is included in the price.   I practise delayed gratification when I get the urge for it.   It works -- usually.    After all, buying one salmon a month at $36 will cost you $432 a year.   Almost enough for:


Y6C: 6-DAY YUKON




SHIP: ms Nieuw Amsterdam
DEPARTS: Vancouver, B.C., CA
ARRIVES: Whitehorse, Yukon

From
CA$497
per person Interior

1 comment:

  1. This was a good post. You cracked me up: "I had to stop shouting, 'There's another $36,'" haha! I grew up in Alaska and ate plenty of salmon, so much so that I got kind of burned out on it. I haven't bought it in so long that I didn't realize how expensive it had gotten. I think if I still liked it and lived in your area I'd have to have a new hobby: fly fishing!

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